Radiation Health and Safety Act and Regulations

Background

The Radiation Health and Safety Act and the Radiation Health and Safety Regulations govern the inspection, installation, use, maintenance and registration of equipment which is capable of producing ionizing radiation such as x-ray machines and CT scanners. The Act came into force in 1977 and while some amendments have been made, a comprehensive review of the legislation has not taken place since it was first enacted.

A copy of the current Radiation Health and Safety Act can be viewed here.

A copy of the current Radiation Health and Safety Regulations can be viewed here.

In this province there are currently 149 owners of radiation emitting equipment.  This total includes the four regional health authorities, 93 dental clinics, 21 veterinary clinics, 19 owners using such equipment for commercial and/or analytical purposes, and 12 others. The 12 others include one police force, four agencies performing baggage screening for security purposes, two educational institutions, four food processing facilities, and one chiropractic clinic.

Introduction

Owners, sellers, service companies and users of equipment capable of producing ionizing radiation are governed under both federal and provincial legislation. These include the Canadian Radiation Emitting Devices Act, various safety codes prepared by Health Canada (Consumer and Clinical Radiation Protection Bureau) and the provincial Radiation Health and Safety Act and the Radiation Health and Safety Regulations. All of these establish safety requirements and guidelines for radiation producing equipment.  In addition, some provinces formally adopt the federal safety codes or, through legislation, require safety measures consistent with them.

In Newfoundland and Labrador, it is the Radiation Health and Safety Act and the Radiation Health and Safety Regulations that establish requirements specific to equipment capable of emitting radiation. This legislation contains some similar general provisions that can be found in Health Canada’s Safety Codes. The guidance provided in the codes ensures a consistent and effective regulatory regime which is crucial to ensuring the safety of workers and others at, or near, where such equipment is used.  There are currently approximately 760 pieces of such equipment registered with the Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Division of Service NL.

Service NL is currently conducting a review of the Radiation Health and Safety Act and the Radiation Health and Safety Regulations. This questionnaire was developed to gather information and opinions on issues of priority from owners, users, sellers and maintainers of equipment which produces ionizing radiation.  Interested parties are encouraged to provide feedback which will be reviewed and considered in the process of updating and amending this Act and the regulations under it.

The questionnaire is divided into eight issues: patient safety requirements – therapeutic and diagnostic x-ray doses; registration; registration by sellers/servicers; worker exposures and maximum permissible doses; radiation protection surveys; Health Canada Safety Codes; Radiation Health and Safety Advisory Committee; and other issues.

We thank you in advance for your participation. The questionnaire will be available until 5:00 p.m. on June 29, 2018. Separate written submissions may be forwarded to [email protected] or sent by regular mail to:

NL Radiation Legislation Review
Occupational Health and Safety Division
Service NL
28 Pippy Place
St. John's, NL  A1B 3X4
 

Persons or organizations wishing to meet with Service NL officials regarding their feedback on the proposed legislative changes should contact the Occupational Health and Safety Division. Written submissions, meeting requests, alternate format requests, and questions related to the discussion document should be submitted via [email protected].

Information for this review is being collected in order to obtain your views on the Radiation Health and Safety Act and Regulations. The authority for this collection comes from section 61(c) of the Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act, 2015. For questions or enquiries in relation to privacy legislation, contact Ellen Haskell at [email protected].

Click here to complete the questionnaire